Artist Statement




I learned photography occurred through a variety

approaches and teachers. One, 
photography as a

conceptual art form, with a clear about-ness of the 

image. The other, from a more traditionally modernist

approach. As it 
is, and for the most part, my

work in photography  has something of both. While I

have a 
deep appreciation for a beautiful

formal photograph, I must ask the question I teach


my students to ask; What is the photograph about?

I am deeply curious about the 
other story, however

fleeting a moment it reveals, and how it relates to


photography’s visual soundness, as photography’s

relationship to truth is constantly 
changing. I am

interested in what happens visually, psychologically,

and emotionally.
 When I alter a photograph, I am

asking 
the question about how to re-represent, re-

think, re-contextualize the original image.


I use the female figure to represent a female way

bigger than me. Over many 
years, the alterations I

make in my photos are in varying stages of the 

process: 
during exposures at night with camera

movement or subject blur, after the print is


made with added selective color, using appropriated

text & image, collage and 
digitally montaged images in

a composition. What begins as an intuitive process of


scenes or of figure are unsurprisingly, parts of my life.


Barbados_Cave.jpg


Blog

A few years ago, I decided to leave North Carolina and move back to New York. Weeks after I got there, my mother slipped on the pavement outside of her apartment getting out of a taxi. The November wind knocked her over. She spent the next seven months in New York in and out of rehab facilities. She came home from one, and fell again after a couple of weeks. Then Meniere's Disease, then more falls, and more rehab. I spent those months in and out of town, taking care of my mom, trying to find work. I walked to Mt Sinai Hospital three to four times per week. This is one of the Sidewalk Memories.

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Artist Statement


Artist Statement




I learned photography occurred through a variety

approaches and teachers. One, 
photography as a

conceptual art form, with a clear about-ness of the 

image. The other, from a more traditionally modernist

approach. As it 
is, and for the most part, my

work in photography  has something of both. While I

have a 
deep appreciation for a beautiful

formal photograph, I must ask the question I teach


my students to ask; What is the photograph about?

I am deeply curious about the 
other story, however

fleeting a moment it reveals, and how it relates to


photography’s visual soundness, as photography’s

relationship to truth is constantly 
changing. I am

interested in what happens visually, psychologically,

and emotionally.
 When I alter a photograph, I am

asking 
the question about how to re-represent, re-

think, re-contextualize the original image.


I use the female figure to represent a female way

bigger than me. Over many 
years, the alterations I

make in my photos are in varying stages of the 

process: 
during exposures at night with camera

movement or subject blur, after the print is


made with added selective color, using appropriated

text & image, collage and 
digitally montaged images in

a composition. What begins as an intuitive process of


scenes or of figure are unsurprisingly, parts of my life.


Barbados_Cave.jpg


BLOG SECTIONS